Managing Speed

Inappropriate speed is a leading and aggravating cause of crashes. Employers need to be aware of what they can do to manage speed as part of managing driver behaviour in general [see also Top 10 Tips for Managing Driver Behaviour]. This new infographic on Managing Speed from the ETSC is a really useful guide and communication tool that employers can use to influence behaviour and share with staff who drive at work

ETSC Managing Speed #DrivingforWork

ETSC Managing Speed #DrivingforWork

Fleets Warned After MP Jailed

Did you know there are major consequences of not telling the truth about penalty points you might receive?

Fleet News reports that company car and van drivers are warned that telling a ‘white lie’ to avoid points on their licence is one of the “most serious offences”.

However, despite the risks involved, a national law firm says more people are choosing to ask a family member or friend to take the points on their behalf.

The warning comes after Peterborough UK MP, Fiona Onasanya, was jailed after she lied to police over a speeding ticket.

A solicitor, Onasanya had denied being behind the wheel of her Nissan Micra when it was clocked being driven at 41mph in a 30mph zone, in July 2017.

Her brother Festus was jailed for 10 months for his involvement, after pleading guilty to the same charge.

Full story here:

https://www.fleetnews.co.uk/news/fleet-industry-news/2019/01/30/fleets-warned-after-speeding-mp-jailed?utm_campaign=30_01_2019_Fleet_News_daily_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=FN%20-%20Newsletter%20-%20Daily&utm_source=adestra&utm_term=Fleets%20warned%20after%20speeding%20MP%20jailed&gutid=7749 

Grey Fleet Review

Driving for Better Business ("DfBB") has just launched its new Grey Fleet Review. It is the first of what will be a series of in-depth reviews into topics that can have a significant effect on both the risk profile and the operational costs of any organisation.

Delivering fresh analysis of the disadvantages – as well as some of the advantages – of privately-owned cars being used for work in the public and private sectors, the Review is an invaluable guide for leaders, fleet managers, drivers and policy-makers.

In the Grey Fleet Review, Driving for Better Business:

  • Examines viable grey fleet alternatives including the latest ‘mobility’ policies,

  • Exposes the cost of grey fleet to the environment and to businesses’ bottom line,

  • Reports on how grey fleet drivers often ignore basic vehicle safety checks,

  • Reveals how organisations have slashed costs by ditching grey fleet, and

  • Explains why grey fleet can be bad for employers and employees.

There is no doubt that grey fleet has a role to play in keeping the wheels of industry and the public sector turning. But, as we show, this comes at a cost. Is grey fleet still a viable solution or should we be looking to replace it in the 21st century? John Pryor, Chair of ACFO and Stephen Briers, Editor-in-Chief at Fleet News, give their views.

The Review outlines duty-of-care and liability dangers for organisations running grey fleet vehicles without proper policies and checks in place – and how employees can be caught out financially if they fail to do the sums.

Here are some of the featured articles:

  • On a Wing and a Prayer - Research shows that grey fleet drivers across Europe are not undertaking basic vehicle maintenance.

  • Out of Control - Companies are losing essential controls for monitoring safety, emissions and compliance.

  • Why your true grey fleet may be bigger than you think - Many businesses with active grey fleets simply do not realise the level of responsibility they have.

  • How do DfBB Champions manage Grey Fleet? - Examples of how a selection of our Driving for Better Business Champions manage their grey fleet.

ABB Ireland - Sustaining Best Practice Road-Risk Management

Driving for work is recognised by ABB as a high-risk, high cost but fundamentally necessary business activity.

Since its inception is 2009, ABB’s Safe Driving for Work Programme - in partnership with Dublin-based DriverFocus - has seen the company sustain a reduction in road incidents and motor claims costs and frequency of over 50%. This performance is viewed as evidence that the majority of work-related collisions in ABB Ireland are preventable when everyone - drivers and management - play their part.

The decline in the cost of collisions is also a compelling return on the time and resources invested in proactively improving the company’s driving environment.

Find out how ABB Ireland achieved these amazing results here.

Older Bosses 'Less Likely' To Monitor Driver Behaviour

Research, commissioned by workforce management company BigChange and the road safety charity Brake, has been published to coincide with the launch of Leaders for Life, a new campaign to help business leaders promote safer driving at work.

It shows that older bosses are most guilty of being disinterested in their employees’ driving. More than half of employers (54%) aged over 55 with responsibility for company drivers take no action to monitor or manage their behaviour, despite nine in ten (87%) saying that road safety is an important concern.

By contrast, just 6% of business leaders aged 18 to 34 fail to monitor their drivers. Young bosses employing company drivers are nine times more likely than their older counterparts to take steps such as implementing vehicle tracking, license checks and random drug and alcohol testing.

The survey also revealed that business leaders are more concerned about cyber security than road safety. While 57% of leaders surveyed said that road safety was ‘very important’ to the operation and reputation of their organisations, the figure increased to 63% when asked about cyber security matters.

Source: Fleet News 27 Sept 2018

Free Fleet Risk Check from DfBB

Fleet Risk Check is an interactive evaluation of your current level of fleet-related risk.

Risk Audit will help you establish how your organisation is managing the risks associated with occupational driving, as well as highlighting areas of weakness, and tailored support is on offer to help you address the issues and concerns you may have.

The risk assessment is divided into four sections, each of which requires you to answer a series of exploratory questions, after which you will be able to download a personalised report showing your current position and with guidance on where and how you should look to improve.

Access to the tool can be found here.

Small investment, Big return

“Could any fleet manager ignore the opportunity to make a small investment that could return 16 times that amount, improve legal compliance and reduce the chance of accidents?”
Tony Greenidge

The occasion of this question was the annual conference of the Institute of Car Fleet Management and the speaker who posed the question was Tony Greenidge of IAM RoadSmart. Both organisations are registered charities. 

Let’s look at the numbers Tony presented, which show how a change in driver behaviour can dramatically cut costs.

He assumed a fleet of 80 cars and 20 vans, averaging 15,000 business miles per annum, having a 15% chance of an at-fault collision every year and a four-year replacement cycle. A fairly typical medium-size fleet.

He presented well-sourced stats that showed that 37% of leased cars and 40% of leased vans are returned with unfair wear and tear, for which the leasing companies charge an average £308 and £414 respectively. That’s a cost of £3,107 for our example fleet, a fair chunk of which might be down to driver behaviour.

The average motor insurance claim is £2,839 (Source: ABI, 2017), and this figure is rising as cars become more complex. If 15% of our assumed fleet is involved in an at-fault collision every year, the cost to the fleet will be £42,585. How much of that could be reduced by changes in driver behaviour? Presumably rather a lot, as these are at-fault claims.

Tony assumed that his fleet of 100 vehicles driving 15,000 miles per annum had an average 44mpg under WLTP, but that the fleet actually averaged 40mpg. He showed that a cost saving of £18,908 was achievable if the driver could be encouraged to drive in a fuel-efficient way.

Then we came to the interesting part, which I hadn’t been aware of. The EST provides a subsidy to approved training organisations for every driver they put through an ecodriving course.  This can reduce the per-head cost of a standard 90-minute course to £30-£40, depending on the provider.

For the assumed fleet of 100 vehicles, the potential savings from ecodriving is £64,600, or £646 per driver. Let’s say the 90-minute ecodriving course costs £40 per head, or £4,000 for all of the drivers. That’s a potential return of more than 16 times the investment.

Fleet World reporter Colin Tourick ended the article by asking: "Costs reduced, emissions reduced, accidents avoided, lives saved, all for £40 per head and 90 minutes outside the business. Why isn’t everyone doing this?"

Source: Fleet World 31 July 2018

DriverFocus comment:

Indeed, however there are some additional points to ponder, such as:
1. What uninsured losses would this sample fleet also face?  Typically, this is a multiple of 2X (or significantly larger multiple) of the "bent-metal" cost
2. If EST funding is not an option, the commercial rates for in-vehicle driver training is significantly higher (again a multiple of 3X or more), which reduces payback. Still, the business case for being proactive is strong.
3. Aside from training everyone, a targeted training programme - based on telemetry, fuel card data and/or risk assessment data - could reduce the training cost and improve return on investment.

NETS Makes It Easy For Employers To Boost Road Safety

As part of Drive Safely Work Week™ (DSWW), the US-based Network of Employers for Traffic Safety ("NETS") has just released quality Campaign Materials to support employers looking to tackle Parking and Reversing as part of their Safe Driving for Work Programmme.

DSWW has been an annual campaign for many years. The DSWW Campaign Materials:

  • include meaningful activities that reinforce the program’s safe-driving messages
  • are ready-to-go and won't take significant time away from your work day
  • are not dated, providing the flexibility you need to schedule with your organisation’s work schedule

Here are some simple steps to Schedule your Drive Safely Work Week

1-2 weeks prior:
- Schedule a training workshop and/or webinar using PPT presentation

During your scheduled Drive Safely Work Week:

  • Post social media announcements throughout the week
  • Distribute employee fact sheet(s)
  • Conduct training workshop and/or webinar using PPT presentation

The Parking and Backing (Reversing) Basics Campaign Materials & Graphics include:

  • Employee Fact Sheet
  • Employee Presentation
  • Posters
  • Social Media & E-mail Graphics

Click here for the NETS Parking & Backing Campaign Materials

Click here for links to DSWW Archives

NETS membership is open to all employers who have vehicle fleets. If you are a vendor company, or are a government/non-profit organisation, please contact Susan Gillies at sgillies@trafficsafety.org or +1 (703) 755 5350 for membership information.

Collision Costs - Is Your Head in the Sand?

When crashes occur, fixing the bent-metal is relatively easy and low-cost.  Just as the human cost can be significant, so too can the hidden costs.

In a recent Fleet News article, several UK industry experts shared their views on the true cost of collsions:
* Paying the cost of vehicle repair or insurance excess is just the tip of the iceberg
* Below the surface costs include losing key personnel to injury or ill-health, loss of business, potential loss of reputation and the expense of hiring replacement vehicles while company cars or vans are off the road
* “One of the challenges is that many of these figures never appear on a balance sheet,” says Andy Price, director of consultancy Fleet Safety Management, adding that “all the CFO sees is the insurance cost and maybe the cost of the excess. They don’t see that the employee was absent for seven hours trying to sort the issue out with the leasing company, or worse that they are off injured as a result of the collision"
* While the true cost can be many multiples of the insured cost, even a more believeable 2X rule of thumb can be an eye-opener
* Andy Price also uses another technique: he calculates how much revenue a company with an average claim cost of £1,000 would have to make to pay for its collisions. If that company has a claim frequency of 25% and profitability of 10%, every vehicle on the fleet – not just those involved in a collision – has to generate £5,000 of revenue to fund the uninsured losses associated with the collisions it is having
* Minimising the cost of crashes can start with vehicle selection. Cars or vans fitted with advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) such as blindspot warning and parking assistance will reduce the likelihood of being involved in a collision, with Thatcham Research saying that autonomous emergency braking (AEB) can reduce the frequency of front and rear crashes by 40%
* But the technology also increases the cost of repair. As well as the expense of the equipment, the work becomes more involved than before
* The Association of British Insurers says the average cost of a car repair bill has risen 32% over the past three years to £1,678, and, while ADAS may not account for the entire increase, it is definitely a major contributor
* Thatcham estimates ADAS technology is currently fitted to around 6% of vehicles on UK roads and expects this to increase to around 40% by 2020, meaning that while, in theory, fewer cars will be in accidents, the costs when they do will rise
* “Once you’ve been involved in a collision, there is a whole industry out there trying to make money from that incident,” added Price. The speed of response after a crash is critical to minimising this cost. Delays in reporting the incident to an insurer or incident management company drastically reduces the opportunity to capture and control the third party costs, such as excessive replacement vehicle costs
* In terms of the human cost, a driver’s well-being should also be considered. Clare Cain, group insurance/risk manager at Kelly Communications, says: “You have to offer support following a collision, not just to improve the driver’s skills, but also to ensure they aren’t suffering from stress or depression"
* Colin Hartley, managing director of risk consultancy Driive, adds that the “ripple effect” means the impact of an incident goes far beyond the driver.

Source: Fleet News - What is the True Cost of a Collision - 24th April 2018

Using In-Vehicle Safety Technology to Improve Road Safety At Work

The ETSC has just released a really simple infographic for employers on how to use in-vehicle safety technology - such as seatbelt reminders, intelligent speed assistance (ISA), alcohol interlocks, telematics, lane keep assist ad automated emergency braking (AEB) - as part of a work-related road safety management programme.

It covers tips on:

  • Getting started
  • Vehicle selection
  • Managing staff's use of in-vehicle technology
  • Working with third-parties

New car technology and autonomous features are truly great and life-saving.  That said, they are not available to all today and there is a significant hype which the ETSC advised in March, "threatens to hold back progress... in reducing the 1.25 million deaths that occur annually on the world's roads".

Most crashes today can be avoided and technology - as part of a fleet risk programme - can help reduce risk by 50% or more.  The key to this, we believe, is managing driver behaviour.  Here are 10 Tips that we/TomTom Telematics published back in 2015 that are still valid.

Also, data gathered by DriverFocus over recent years, provides some insight on HOW the average at-work driver performs - both with and without "supervision" in the form of a "behaviour monitoring programme".  For example, just 3% of unmonitored drivers managed to score as well as the average monitored driver!

In short, we're big fans of technology to improve driving for work risk, however creating the right environment that supports and expects good, safe driving behaviour requires a little more thought and effort.  The results are real and well worth it!

Download the ETSC Infographic here

Source: https://etsc.eu/infographic-using-safety-technology/
 

Source: https://etsc.eu/infographic-using-safety-t...

ETSC Warns Of "Hype Surrounding Automated Driving"

In a recent article in the Financial Times, the ETSC was very clear in warning of the delays in improving the minimum safety standards of vehicles for almost a decade.

"The hype surrounding automated driving threatens to hold back progress over the next few years in reducing the 1.25m deaths that occur annually on the world’s roads.

By 2030, there may well be a few million self-driving cars globally, but there will also be more than 1bn cars driving that do not have such features. Many of those vehicles are the ones that will leave factories this year and next. The issue is that policymakers, as well as carmakers, are becoming so obsessed with the dream of an autonomous future that they are ignoring many of the causes of road collisions that could be avoided today through the use of existing, widely available and affordable technologies.

Autonomous Emergency Braking, Intelligent Speed Assistance and Lane Keeping Systems could be as effective for reducing road deaths as the seatbelt has been. But, like the seatbelt, we will only see the biggest safety gains when all cars are fitted. Offering them as optional extras, or only on premium models, as today, is not good enough.

But delaying or avoiding action now would be a disaster. Especially so if, as is likely, full autonomy faces huge practical obstacles to implementation along the way."

Source:  ETSC 26th Feb 2018

ESB Host First Cross-Industry Forum

Last week in Newbridge, Co Kildare, saw the hosting of the first Cross-Industry Forum on Road Safety in Ireland.  This successful half-day event is an inspired initiative by the ESB and is just one of a number of elements of the company's "Road Safety Strategy 2013-2020: Our Journey To Excellence".

Leading road safety champions and DriverFocus clients, ESB, ABB, Irish Rail, SSE and Ervia were joined by representatives from eir, An Post, KTL, KN Networks and other organisations to share their experience and best-practices in managing work-related road risk.  Well-planned and ably facilitated, there was fantastic, active participation from all, in the series of workshops, which covered a wide-range of driving-related topics including grey fleet, driver behaviour, telematics, audits, distraction, driver communications, driving for work policies and daily vehicle checks. 

DriverFocus and FTA Ireland were invited along to support the forum with stands featuring relevant information and resources.

At the close, strong interest expressed for the next event, with several offers to host - a definite sign that the Forum was heading in the right direction!

Further information: ESB Road Safety Strategy 2013-2020

Related: Kudos to ESB (LinkedIn Post)