Using In-Vehicle Safety Technology to Improve Road Safety At Work

The ETSC has just released a really simple infographic for employers on how to use in-vehicle safety technology - such as seatbelt reminders, intelligent speed assistance (ISA), alcohol interlocks, telematics, lane keep assist ad automated emergency braking (AEB) - as part of a work-related road safety management programme.

It covers tips on:

  • Getting started
  • Vehicle selection
  • Managing staff's use of in-vehicle technology
  • Working with third-parties

New car technology and autonomous features are truly great and life-saving.  That said, they are not available to all today and there is a significant hype which the ETSC advised in March, "threatens to hold back progress... in reducing the 1.25 million deaths that occur annually on the world's roads".

Most crashes today can be avoided and technology - as part of a fleet risk programme - can help reduce risk by 50% or more.  The key to this, we believe, is managing driver behaviour.  Here are 10 Tips that we/TomTom Telematics published back in 2015 that are still valid.

Also, data gathered by DriverFocus over recent years, provides some insight on HOW the average at-work driver performs - both with and without "supervision" in the form of a "behaviour monitoring programme".  For example, just 3% of unmonitored drivers managed to score as well as the average monitored driver!

In short, we're big fans of technology to improve driving for work risk, however creating the right environment that supports and expects good, safe driving behaviour requires a little more thought and effort.  The results are real and well worth it!

Download the ETSC Infographic here

Source: https://etsc.eu/infographic-using-safety-technology/
 

Source: https://etsc.eu/infographic-using-safety-t...

ETSC Warns Of "Hype Surrounding Automated Driving"

In a recent article in the Financial Times, the ETSC was very clear in warning of the delays in improving the minimum safety standards of vehicles for almost a decade.

"The hype surrounding automated driving threatens to hold back progress over the next few years in reducing the 1.25m deaths that occur annually on the world’s roads.

By 2030, there may well be a few million self-driving cars globally, but there will also be more than 1bn cars driving that do not have such features. Many of those vehicles are the ones that will leave factories this year and next. The issue is that policymakers, as well as carmakers, are becoming so obsessed with the dream of an autonomous future that they are ignoring many of the causes of road collisions that could be avoided today through the use of existing, widely available and affordable technologies.

Autonomous Emergency Braking, Intelligent Speed Assistance and Lane Keeping Systems could be as effective for reducing road deaths as the seatbelt has been. But, like the seatbelt, we will only see the biggest safety gains when all cars are fitted. Offering them as optional extras, or only on premium models, as today, is not good enough.

But delaying or avoiding action now would be a disaster. Especially so if, as is likely, full autonomy faces huge practical obstacles to implementation along the way."

Source:  ETSC 26th Feb 2018

Does My Organisation Need To Manage Road Risk

The ETSC (European Transport Safety Council) has just published an excellent, two-page infographic that helps business-owners, directors and managers find out:

  1. Whether their organisation needs to manage Road-Risk?
  2. If so, what are the key steps involved in starting a Programme 
  3. What are the attributes of a Safe Driver 
  4. Features of a Safe Organisation
  5. Some key aspects to consider

A PDF version of this ETSC infographic can be found here and you might also want to check out the ETSC's Benefits of Road-Risk Management and our Infographics relating to Road-Risk Preparedness and Hallmarks of Best-Practice Programmes

Up To 40% Of Road Deaths In Europe Work-Related

Employers, national governments and the EU are being urged to take action to tackle work-related road risk, as latest estimates suggest that up to 40% of all road deaths in Europe are work-related.

The analysis of EU road safety data, published today by the European Transport Safety Council (ETSC), finds that a total of 25,671 lives were lost on the road in the European Union in 2016.

Although the exact number of work-related road (WRR) collisions is unknown, based on detailed analysis of data from across Europe, the authors estimate that up to 40% of all road deaths are work-related. In the UK, DfT figures find that at least one in three (31%) fatal crashes and one in four (26%) serious injury crashes in Britain involve someone driving for work.

In response – and as EU road death figures stagnate – the new ETSC report sets out that employers are essential to tackling road risk but says fleets need help and support from national governments and the EU to take action.

The authors also say that government and public authorities should lead by example and adopt work-related road safety management programmes for their employees and their fleets and include vehicle safety in public procurement requirements.

Another key recomendation for member states is to establish a centralised certification service for suppliers who are in compliance with work-related road risk management legal requirements and have safe work policies.

Ireland, along with France, Switzerland, Spain, Italy and Germany performed best in data collection
and reporting of WWR deaths compared to the 32 countries covered in the report.

Commenting on the report, Jason Wakeford, spokesman for Brake, the UK road safety charity, said: "Reductions in the numbers killed on UK roads have stagnated in recent years. Road deaths fell by just 1.4% between 2010 and 2016 - way short of the EU target. All other EU countries, with the exception of Lithuania, Malta and Sweden, have made better progress and urgent action is needed. It's a disgrace that there are currently no UK targets for reducing the number of road deaths and we are calling for a UK target to be set as a priority for the Government".

Source/Report: European Transport Safety Council (ETSC)