NETS Makes It Easy For Employers To Boost Road Safety

As part of Drive Safely Work Week™ (DSWW), the US-based Network of Employers for Traffic Safety ("NETS") has just released quality Campaign Materials to support employers looking to tackle Parking and Reversing as part of their Safe Driving for Work Programmme.

DSWW has been an annual campaign for many years. The DSWW Campaign Materials:

  • include meaningful activities that reinforce the program’s safe-driving messages
  • are ready-to-go and won't take significant time away from your work day
  • are not dated, providing the flexibility you need to schedule with your organisation’s work schedule

Here are some simple steps to Schedule your Drive Safely Work Week

1-2 weeks prior:
- Schedule a training workshop and/or webinar using PPT presentation

During your scheduled Drive Safely Work Week:

  • Post social media announcements throughout the week
  • Distribute employee fact sheet(s)
  • Conduct training workshop and/or webinar using PPT presentation

The Parking and Backing (Reversing) Basics Campaign Materials & Graphics include:

  • Employee Fact Sheet
  • Employee Presentation
  • Posters
  • Social Media & E-mail Graphics

Click here for the NETS Parking & Backing Campaign Materials

Click here for links to DSWW Archives

NETS membership is open to all employers who have vehicle fleets. If you are a vendor company, or are a government/non-profit organisation, please contact Susan Gillies at sgillies@trafficsafety.org or +1 (703) 755 5350 for membership information.

Collision Costs - Is Your Head in the Sand?

When crashes occur, fixing the bent-metal is relatively easy and low-cost.  Just as the human cost can be significant, so too can the hidden costs.

In a recent Fleet News article, several UK industry experts shared their views on the true cost of collsions:
* Paying the cost of vehicle repair or insurance excess is just the tip of the iceberg
* Below the surface costs include losing key personnel to injury or ill-health, loss of business, potential loss of reputation and the expense of hiring replacement vehicles while company cars or vans are off the road
* “One of the challenges is that many of these figures never appear on a balance sheet,” says Andy Price, director of consultancy Fleet Safety Management, adding that “all the CFO sees is the insurance cost and maybe the cost of the excess. They don’t see that the employee was absent for seven hours trying to sort the issue out with the leasing company, or worse that they are off injured as a result of the collision"
* While the true cost can be many multiples of the insured cost, even a more believeable 2X rule of thumb can be an eye-opener
* Andy Price also uses another technique: he calculates how much revenue a company with an average claim cost of £1,000 would have to make to pay for its collisions. If that company has a claim frequency of 25% and profitability of 10%, every vehicle on the fleet – not just those involved in a collision – has to generate £5,000 of revenue to fund the uninsured losses associated with the collisions it is having
* Minimising the cost of crashes can start with vehicle selection. Cars or vans fitted with advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) such as blindspot warning and parking assistance will reduce the likelihood of being involved in a collision, with Thatcham Research saying that autonomous emergency braking (AEB) can reduce the frequency of front and rear crashes by 40%
* But the technology also increases the cost of repair. As well as the expense of the equipment, the work becomes more involved than before
* The Association of British Insurers says the average cost of a car repair bill has risen 32% over the past three years to £1,678, and, while ADAS may not account for the entire increase, it is definitely a major contributor
* Thatcham estimates ADAS technology is currently fitted to around 6% of vehicles on UK roads and expects this to increase to around 40% by 2020, meaning that while, in theory, fewer cars will be in accidents, the costs when they do will rise
* “Once you’ve been involved in a collision, there is a whole industry out there trying to make money from that incident,” added Price. The speed of response after a crash is critical to minimising this cost. Delays in reporting the incident to an insurer or incident management company drastically reduces the opportunity to capture and control the third party costs, such as excessive replacement vehicle costs
* In terms of the human cost, a driver’s well-being should also be considered. Clare Cain, group insurance/risk manager at Kelly Communications, says: “You have to offer support following a collision, not just to improve the driver’s skills, but also to ensure they aren’t suffering from stress or depression"
* Colin Hartley, managing director of risk consultancy Driive, adds that the “ripple effect” means the impact of an incident goes far beyond the driver.

Source: Fleet News - What is the True Cost of a Collision - 24th April 2018

NETS: Off-The-Job Crashes Are Major Employer Cost

The USA's Network of Employers for Traffic Safety (NETS) is an employer-led public/private partnership dedicated to improving the safety and health of employees, their families, and members of the communities in which they live and work by preventing traffic crashes that occur both on- and off-the-job.

NETS has this week released a new Cost of Collisions Calculator, developed by NETS through a cooperative agreement with NHTSA, which can be utilised by employers* to measure their company’s cost of crashes.

Employers pay for injuries that occur both on and off the job. 

In the USA in 2013, motor vehicle crashes killed more than 1,600 people and injured 293,000 while they were working.  More than half of the injuries forced people to miss work. Overall, on-the-job crash injuries (fatal and non-fatal) amounted to about 7.5 percent of all crash injuries.

Motor vehicle crash injuries on and off the job cost employers $47.4 billion in 2013. Almost one half of this cost resulted from off-the-job injuries to workers and their dependents.

Knowing an occupational fleet’s costs enables management to develop a business case that supports an investment in fleet safety. Knowing the on- and off-the-job crash costs for all employees and their dependents provides employers with justification to invest in employee-wide safe driving programs.

Protecting employees from motor vehicle crash injury can be a profitable investment of
time and resources. Traffic safety programmes are an alternative to reduce health care
expenses to employers without reducing the benefits offered to employees. 

* Note: Aside from the Disclaimer on the NETS website, the Cost of crashes calculator and related report are clearly based on factors specific to the driving for work environment in the USA which may or may not apply in Ireland/UK.  It is advised that estimates provided by both the calculator and report are indicative, vary widely even by state and should be treated with a degree of caution

Source: NETS Cost of Motor Vehicle Crashes To Employers
Cost of crashes calculator: (note: site is not secured by SSL)
NETS Membership information

Up To 40% Of Road Deaths In Europe Work-Related

Employers, national governments and the EU are being urged to take action to tackle work-related road risk, as latest estimates suggest that up to 40% of all road deaths in Europe are work-related.

The analysis of EU road safety data, published today by the European Transport Safety Council (ETSC), finds that a total of 25,671 lives were lost on the road in the European Union in 2016.

Although the exact number of work-related road (WRR) collisions is unknown, based on detailed analysis of data from across Europe, the authors estimate that up to 40% of all road deaths are work-related. In the UK, DfT figures find that at least one in three (31%) fatal crashes and one in four (26%) serious injury crashes in Britain involve someone driving for work.

In response – and as EU road death figures stagnate – the new ETSC report sets out that employers are essential to tackling road risk but says fleets need help and support from national governments and the EU to take action.

The authors also say that government and public authorities should lead by example and adopt work-related road safety management programmes for their employees and their fleets and include vehicle safety in public procurement requirements.

Another key recomendation for member states is to establish a centralised certification service for suppliers who are in compliance with work-related road risk management legal requirements and have safe work policies.

Ireland, along with France, Switzerland, Spain, Italy and Germany performed best in data collection
and reporting of WWR deaths compared to the 32 countries covered in the report.

Commenting on the report, Jason Wakeford, spokesman for Brake, the UK road safety charity, said: "Reductions in the numbers killed on UK roads have stagnated in recent years. Road deaths fell by just 1.4% between 2010 and 2016 - way short of the EU target. All other EU countries, with the exception of Lithuania, Malta and Sweden, have made better progress and urgent action is needed. It's a disgrace that there are currently no UK targets for reducing the number of road deaths and we are calling for a UK target to be set as a priority for the Government".

Source/Report: European Transport Safety Council (ETSC)